News & Events

  • Bloomberg writes about a study linking above-normal amounts of naturally occurring radiation in a Pennsylvania creek to hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in the area of the creek, which flows into the Allegheny River.

    The study, co-authored by Dartmouth’s Nathaniel Warner when he was at Duke University, was published this week in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, Bloomberg notes.

    “While earlier studies have...

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  • Nature points to a new study co-authored by Dartmouth’s Mukul Sharma, a professor in the Department of Earth Sciences, that links the impact of a comet or meteor striking the Earth to the dramatic global climate change that occurred 12,900 years ago.

    “I’d say there’s evidence of an impact happening, for sure,” Sharma tells Nature. The researchers...

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  • For the first time, a dramatic climate shift that has long fascinated scientists has been linked to the impact in Quebec of an asteroid or comet, Dartmouth researchers and their colleagues report in a new study funded by the National Science Foundation.

    The event took place about 12,900 years ago, at the beginning of the Younger Dryas period, and marks an abrupt global change to a colder, dryer climate, with far-reaching...

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  • JOSEPH BLUMBERG

    On June 18, Erich Osterberg left Alaska’s Denali National Park, where a collaborative Dartmouth-University of Maine-University of New Hampshire team had chronicled 1,000 years of regional climatic history.

    “We drilled two 700-foot, 4-inch-wide holes to bedrock through the glacier on Mount Hunter, the third highest peak in the Alaska Range and Denali’s...

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  • Scientific progress has transformed Darwin’s simple evolutionary tree of life into a bush with a myriad of branches, representing phylogenetic relationships. Now the research of Dartmouth’s molecular palaeobiologist Kevin Peterson is telling us that the branches may all be in the wrong places. Peterson, an associate professor of biological sciences and an adjunct professor of...

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  • JOSEPH BLUMBERG

    In a geological moment about 66 million years ago, something killed off almost all the dinosaurs and some 70 percent of all other species living on Earth. Only those dinosaurs related to birds appear to have survived. Most scientists agree that the culprit in this extinction was extraterrestrial, and the prevailing opinion has been that the party crasher was an asteroid.

    Not so, say two Dartmouth researchers. Professors Jason Moore and...

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  • Joseph Blumberg

    The devastation recently wrought by Superstorm Sandy reawakens memories of Tropical Storm Irene, still fresh in the minds of many Vermonters. Irene’s legacy is evident in ruined rivers, shattered homes, and historic covered bridges washed away. Perhaps more unsettling is the prospect of more to come, say a pair of Dartmouth professors who are studying the damage Irene left behind.

    “There is no smoking gun here that directly associates Irene with global...

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  • In a New York Times story about research on a hydrozoan known as the “immortal jellyfish,” Dartmouth’s Kevin Peterson, associate professor of biological sciences and adjunct professor of earth sciences, says there is a “shocking amount of genetic similarity between jellyfish and human beings.” The genetic similarities, Peterson tells the Times, may have implications for medicine, especially in terms of longevity and cancer research.

    “Immortality might be much more...

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  • Joseph Blumberg

    Many of us felt it and more even heard the rumbling. At approximately 7:12 p.m. last evening (Tuesday, October 16), the ground shook throughout New England.

    According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the epicenter of the 4.6 magnitude quake was in southwest Maine, three miles west of Hollis Center, originating at a depth of about five kilometers. The USGS initially gave the earthquake a 4.6-magnitude rating and later downgraded it to 4.0...

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  • Joseph Blumberg

    Radioactive iodine found by Dartmouth researchers in the local New Hampshire environment is a direct consequence of a nuclear reactor’s explosion and meltdown half a world away, says Joshua Landis, a research associate in the Department of Earth Sciences.

    The failure of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility, following the March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami, was the largest nuclear disaster since 1986 at Chernobyl. “We live on a really small...

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